Where our story begins

Christianity starts with the assertion that there is something deeply wrong with the world. It starts with the observation that the world is not as it should be and the conviction that what is wrong is not some minor flaw that can be easily removed by just a bit more human effort. Christianity tells the story of the world as the Bible does: It is a good creation that is fallen.

If you do not accept that story, then there is little in Christianity that makes sense. If you think the world is basically good and getting better all the time, then it does not need a savior and we do not need Jesus. If you think that the only problem in the world is that we have not yet tried hard enough or discovered the right tools, then you will not believe that the solution to every problem has already been given to us.

Christians tell the story this way. God created all that is and gave us dominion within his good creation. And God gave us the free choice to live in harmony with and obedience to his just, perfect, and loving commands. We rejected these gifts. We broke the world. We ushered in death and all the evils that follow in its train. And as the world shattered, we were shattered down to the very deepest depths of our heart and soul.

Salvation is nothing less than a restoration — a recreation — in the life of a person and the entire world of the joy, peace, harmony, and love that God first instilled in us. It is a gift and work of God, but one we must both accept and nurture within ourselves, for the old impulses die hard.

A preacher named John Wesley believed this and taught it to anyone who would receive it. As United Methodists — but I would argue as Christians — this is what we teach as well.

The question so few ask

This morning, I was re-reading John Wesley’s sermon “Justification by Faith,” but I did not make it very far before I was brought up short. Indeed, I only made it through the first two sentences.

How a sinner may be justified before God, the Lord and Judge of all, is a question of no common importance to every child of man. It contains the foundation of all our hope, inasmuch as while we are at enmity with God, there can be no true peace, no solid joy, either in time or in eternity.

Ask yourself for a moment: How many people spend any amount of time pre-occupied with this question? Do you know anyone? And yet, for Christians it is among the most important questions in the world.

Christianity starts from a place that the world does not. It starts by saying that the secret to peace, joy, and happiness in this world and the next is getting right with God. It starts by saying that we are unhappy and the world is full of horrors because human beings are in rebellion against God. We do not bend on our knees like Jesus in the garden and say “thy will be done,” but we say “my will be done,” and hence all manner of evils wash over the world.

In America, Christians live in a culture that has turned “my will be done” into the purpose of existence. A lot of this has been done by people who want to sell us things and have discovered that unbridled indulgence of our impulses and desires turns quite a profit. But it also goes deep into our political culture.

So as a Christian who lives in America, and as a pastor, I find it quite difficult to imagine how to move non-Christians and nominal Christians to the place where they can even comprehend the importance of this most basic question. What can I say or do? How do you persuade people that the first step toward joy and peace in their lives is to understand that they are sinners?

I have searched quite a while for an answer, and I have found many who will offer me answers. And yet, so many of them seem to suggest the thing can be done without God. If we hit upon the proper technique, work hard enough, and have enough talent, we can move human hearts. It feels ominously like we are saying we can do it on our own.

And so, I find myself driven to embrace what the church has taught for centuries. It is a work of grace. It is by grace — and not by human art — that a person comes to understand that the problems of the world are as old as Cain and Abel and rooted in the same cause. We are wretched wanderers far from God. It is grace that opens our eyes to the truth that we are far from God and therefore far from the happiness that we crave.

As pastors and Christians, we must speak truthfully about God, but we cannot be discouraged if we are not able to persuade. If the world rejects our diagnosis, we cannot become downcast. While we should work as hard as we can, we must work with the knowledge that it is grace and not our effort that moves the human heart.

And so, we keep asking the question, even if the world shows no interest. The Holy Spirit will do his work. We must do ours.

 

Augustine: On polygamy

I’ve been reading Augustine’s little work “On Christian Teaching,” recently. In it, I came upon his interesting discussion of polygamy in the Old Testament.

Augustine uses the topic of Old Testament polygamy to make a point about the necessity of reading and interpreting Scripture with an understanding that it offers different instructions and teaching to different people depending on their need.

When interpreting the examples of virtuous polygamy in the Old Testament, Augustine writes that God wants us to see that human practices that we condemn can be used for good purposes and practices that we praise can be used for  damnable ends.

In the times and conditions of the Old Testament, therefore, a man could have several wives for the purposes of producing many children and remain chaste if his sexual relations with them were aimed at this good purpose of reproduction. In contrast, Augustine writes, a fifth century Christian could be faithfully married to one woman but be consumed by lust in his sexual relations, using her body only as a means to satisfy his appetites. In the conditions of the Old Testament, he writes, polygamy was a duty for the good of the people as a whole, but one that was practiced justly only with an absence of lust. By the fifth century, however, the conditions no longer required such arrangements, and so polygamy is condemned outright.

I share this without really knowing what to make of it or how to incorporate it into my own understanding of sexual holiness and theology. Here are a few reactions I have.

  1. Augustine assumes that sex has a purpose – procreation. He also takes as given that lust is bad. This makes him incomprehensible to contemporary American culture.
  2. His point about sex within marriage being liable to sin drives home how little we hear such things in today’s church. In many evangelical churches, indeed, it almost sounds as if marriage is being sold as great because it gives a green light to lust.
  3. His emphasis on purposes and intention highlights for me how much of our talk is about formalities. Augustine reminds me that marriage is necessary for holy sexual practices but it is not sufficient. Sex that honors God’s intention for human sexuality requires more than a wedding ring.
  4. I am struck by Augustine’s trust in the harmony of Scripture and the revelation of God. When confronted by the contradiction between Old Testament polygamy and New Testament condemnation of the practice, he does not declare part of Scripture as inconsistent with the nature of God or declare the Bible unreliable. Instead, he starts from the affirmation that God is good, just, and self-consistent and seeks to understand the witness of Scripture from that starting point. This approach would not serve him well in many contemporary seminary classrooms.

Like I wrote above, these are not very organized thoughts. I wonder what any of this stirs up for you?