The test of a false prophet

As I was pondering in recent weeks what it means to preach about the way to heaven, I was caught short in my ponderings by the words of John Wesley in his sermons on the Sermon on the Mount (there has to be a less awkward way to phrase that). I want to explore part of one of those sermons with you today, not to cast criticism on anyone else but to test and examine my own ministry.

I turn to Wesley’s 12th sermon on the Sermon on the Mount in which Wesley considers the warnings in Matthew 7:15-20.

Watch out for false prophets. They come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ferocious wolves. By their fruit you will recognize them. Do people pick grapes from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? Likewise, every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, and a bad tree cannot bear good fruit. 19 Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. Thus, by their fruit you will recognize them.

If you have any doubts that preaching the way to heaven is one of Wesley’s chief concerns, this sermon will clear such confusion away. The biblical verses warn of false prophets, and so Wesley begins by explaining what a prophet is: “those men who profess to be sent of God, to teach others the way to heaven.”

And he continues this emphasis on heaven as he explains what makes a preacher a false prophet.

“Those are false prophets, who teach a false way to heaven, a way which does not lead thither.”

And what is the true way? Wesley finds his answer in looking to the beginning of Christ’s sermon, at what are commonly called the Beattitudes of Matthew 5:1-12.

Now the way to heaven pointed out in the preceeding sermon is the way of lowliness, mourning, meekness, and holy desire, love of God and our neighbour, doing good, and suffering evil for Christ’s sake. They are, therefore, false prophets, who teach, as the way to heaven, any other way than this.

To give an all-too-short a summary of Wesley’s point, he is saying that the way to heaven is a way of spiritual grief over our own sinfulness, a way of a changed life animated by the love and forgiveness of Christ, and a way of worldly reproach for our obedience to a God the world does not recognize as its own.

It is a narrow way and often a difficult way, which makes it usually an unpopular way. We all want to be told that the way to heaven is a broad way and that everyone arrives on that happy shore. We want to be told that it does not matter if we let our pride, sloth, ego, lust, and rage rule us because the doors of heaven will still be open to us. None of us want to hear that we are wrong about that, preachers or laity.

But if it is true, then what we want to hear — and what we pastors find it easy to say — is irrelevant. If it is true — as Christ says — that the way to the Kingdom is narrow and few find it, then woe to us who ignore this truth. We should seek earnestly what has been revealed to us about the way to heaven in the Bible. It should be of highest priority to all who preach and, indeed, everyone else as well.

And so the question I put to myself today is this: Have I been a false prophet or true? Do I preach in a way that makes the narrow way clear? Or do I tend to comfort those on the broad way to destruction too much?

These are questions for me to weigh but not answer in this moment as I write this post.

I will, however, close with Wesley’s exhortation to preachers that closes his sermon. I read it as words written for me, but I share them with you as well.

Humble yourselves before him. Cry unto him out of the dust, that he may first quicken thy soul; give thee the faith that worketh by love; that is lowly and meek, pure and merciful, zealous of good works, rejoicing in tribulation, in reproach, in distress, in persecution for rightousness’ sake! So shall “the Spirit of glory and of Christ rest upon thee,” and it shall appear that God hath sent thee. So shalt thou indeed “do the work of an Evangelist, and make full proof of thy ministry.” So shall the word of God in thy mouth be “an hammer that breaketh the rocks in pieces!” It shall then be known by thy fruits that thou art a Prophet of the Lord, even by the children whom God hath given thee. And having “turned many to righteousness,” thou shalt “shine as the stars for ever and ever!”

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