Our origin story in five sentences

A brief account of the orgin and rise of Methodism as a movement taken from the minutes of an early Methodist conference:

In 1729, two young men, reading the Bible, saw they could not be saved without holiness, followed after it, and incited others so to do.

Note here: The first impulse was toward holiness and the conviction that without it no one can be saved. This conviction runs deeply counter to the common hope of ordinary Christians, then and now, that they will be saved despite their lack of holiness and their lack of desire to seek it.

In 1737 they saw holiness comes by faith.

Eight years! This explains why Aldersgate was such a big deal for John Wesley. For nine years he had searched earnestly for holiness and not found it within himself. For a year, he had been convinced that faith was the doorway but it had stood closed to him until that night his heart was strangely warmed and he knew that Christ had forgiven even him for his sins.

They saw likewise, that men are justified before they are sanctified; but still holiness was their point.

In the words of old Methodism, we go on to perfection. Jesus Christ gives us the power to overcome every temptation and sin, but we have not yet learned to use that power or lean into it fully. We need grace to help us grow.

God then thrust them out, utterly against their will, to raise a holy people. When Satan could no otherwise hinder this, he threw up Calvinism in the way; and then Antinomianism, which strikes directly at the root of all holiness.

Of course, the Church of England, Calvinists, and advocates of various forms of Antinomianism would tell a different story than this last part, but at the very least we might remember that at one time it was possible for Methodists to imagine that our work was worthy enough to deem it God’s own work and dangerous enough to stir up the opposition of Satan.

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One thought on “Our origin story in five sentences

  1. Great stuff, John (if you will pardon my use of the vernacular to describe your good writing). Please keep on feeding our souls.

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