The danger of Christmas

It is that time of year when that slumbering beast the Christmas marketing machine stirs from its summer hibernation, opens its glittering jaws, and tries to devour all light and joy within itself.

On every screen that captivates our attention and in every shop window and aisle, we are bombarded with the message that happiness lies in buying things and getting gifts. Economic empires rise and fall based on how well companies can convince us to covet the new and pretty things that they have to offer us.

In the face of this onslaught of materialism, I received this small gift and reminder from John Wesley as I was reading his sixth sermon on the Sermon on the Mount.

[O]ur prayers are the proper test of our desires; nothing being fit to have a place in our desires which is not fit to have a place in our prayers: What we may not pray for, neither should we desire.

The trick with such a quotation, of course, is that we have a lot of teachers in the church who have taught us to pray for exactly the same things that the secular marketing machine wants us to desire. We have far too many pastors and teachers who teach us to pray not for our “daily bread” but for gold and fame and so many other treasures that perish like dust.

So the work of the church, in many cases, is the work of redigging old wells. We have to teach people what it means to pray as a Christian rather than as a well-trained participant in our economic system, and we have to help each other bend our desires to the things that our Lord would have us seek.

The old Methodist teaching went something like this. As we pray that God give us our daily bread — just what we need to make it through the day each day — so this is all we should desire. While we work hard to make the most of the gifts God has placed in our hands, we are called to desire nothing more than the simple necessities that secure life and provide for the needs of our families. Perhaps the Lord will bless us with more than this, but we should desire only what our Lord himself had for himself: sufficient food to eat, clothing to wear, a roof over our heads (and even he did not always have that), the comfort of friends, good work to do, and time alone with God.

Perhaps this is too spare a list. It feels that way to me if I am honest about the rumblings of my own heart. But here is the challenge I place before myself. Search the scriptures. See what our Lord teaches on these matters. Ask whether that rumbling in our hearts comes from the Holy Spirit or is perhaps the sign of another spirit at work in us.

We celebrate on Christmas the child born in a feeding trough for animals. It is not proper for us to desire more than our king required.

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2 thoughts on “The danger of Christmas

  1. Do a WWJD. Jesus simply ignored the nonsense of his day. The worst thing you can do to the debt driven marketing beast is to ignore it. Don’t play. With that great prophet Homey D Clown yell, “Homey don’t play that!” Thank you, Richard F Hicks, OKC

  2. Let your neighbors do all the heavy lifting to keep the economy going, the Christmas lights blazing, the kettles filled, the malls open, the seasonal workers employed, the small business owner still in business, the toy sellers giving thanks, the town squares lit, the parade routes crowded, the Christmas movies sold out. [Smile]

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