Do you need searching or encouraging?

Here is another case of John Wesley’s attention to the different spiritual states of men and women to whom he was pastor. It comes from some advice in a letter he wrote to a band leader in 1762:

As to your Band, there are two sorts of persons with whom you may have to do – the earnest and the slack. The way you are to take with the one is quite different from that one would take with the other. The latter you must search, and find why they are slack; exhort them to repent, be zealous, do the first works. The former you have only to encourage, to exhort to push forward to the mark, to bid them grasp the prize so nigh!

If we had to sort the people in our congregations into these two groups, could we do it? Do we know the slack and the earnest? Can we tell the difference? Would we like the results if we could?

Of course, a lot of our answers here will have to do with definitions. Without a clear notion in our heads about what it means to “push forward to the mark,” we will have a hard time identifying those who are and those who are not pushing forward. We will have a devil of a time sorting out who needs to be encouraged and who needs to be searched.

We will have an even more difficult time of it if we do not let our means of assessment settle on merely outward things. If we look for changed hearts rather than clean finger nails, it will be even more challenging. And yet, Wesley would say, that is why we were called to this work.

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2 thoughts on “Do you need searching or encouraging?

  1. Do we not recognize the place of “exhortation” in ministry? Something similar takes place in the classroom. There will be those we only encourage, but others we tutor (and correct). I sometimes dismiss the eager and resourceful to early lunch, but the lackadaisical and error-prone I personally tutor and exhort. I work at getting every student to the finish line.

    1. Exhorter used to be an actual job in the church. I notice here that Wesley calls for exhorting both the slack and the earnest, just in different ways.

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