Covenant: Crown or curse?

Have you ever read the full statement from which the Covenant Prayer in the Wesleyan Tradition is adapted?

Directions for Renewing Our Covenant with God

In the second section of the pamphlet, Wesley lays out the choice in clear terms:

Turn either to the right-hand or the left; lay both parts before you, with every link of each; Christ with his yoke, this cross and his crown; or the Devil with his wealth, his pleasure and curse: and then put yourselves to thus: “Soul, thou sees what is before thee, what wilt thou do? Which will thou have, either the crown or the curse? If thou chose the crown, remember that the day  thou take this, thou must be content to submit to the cross and yoke, the service and sufferings of Christ, which are linked to it. What sayest thou? Hadst thou rather take the gains and pleasures of sin, and venture on the curse? Or will thou yield thyself a servant to Christ, and so make sure the crown?

Suffice it to say, Wesley was not schooled in seeker sensitive ministry.

Read the entire pamphlet for the full scope of the meaning of covenant in the Wesleyan tradition that is suggested and hinted at in the prayer from the United Methodist Hymnal.

Not a bad gig some days

“How do I get that?”

I had been talking to a woman about God. She was convinced that God could never look on her with love. She had done too much that in her own eyes was wrong and unworthy of God.

In all her talk, she had never uttered the word “Jesus,” even though she had talked over and over about her certainty that God “is there.”

So, I asked her about Jesus. She did not know what to say about him. She was not sure how God was Jesus and Jesus was God. It was all confusing. So, we talked about that for a little bit.

Then I talked to her about the fact that God loves us, loves her. I talked about the fact that all of us — me as much as any — fall short of the glory of God. We all are sinners. We all have a list of the ways we fall short of God’s dreams for our lives.

But the good news is this: While we were yet sinners, Jesus Christ died for us.

And I talked about the cross and forgiveness and new life.

I talked about the sense, the assurance, the knowledge that one can have that Jesus Christ loves me and died for me and forgives me, even me, for all sin.

“How can I get that?” she asked.

And so I talked about faith. I talked about trust in Jesus. I talked about it being something that we receive not something we do. I asked her if she would like to pray with me.

“I was going to ask you if we could,” she said.

And so we prayed. We confessed our sin. We asked to be forgiven. We named Jesus as Lord and Savior. We thanked him for all he has done and will do for us. One after the other. Voice after voice.

As she prayed, she cried.

We said “Amen.”

When I saw her the next day we talked about building on that foundation. We talked about finding a church where others could help her continue what had begun.

She said that before she had been seeking relationship with God. She thought she had it. But what she had was not real. It needed drugs and alcohol to keep her numb.

“I know what it means now. I know what it means to have a relationship with Jesus.”

She smiled.

Some days, being a pastor is not at all a bad way to get along in this world.

You, sinner, can find mercy #LukeActs2014

He told them, “This is what is written: The Messiah will suffer and rise from the dead on the third day, and repentance for the forgiveness of sins will be preached in his name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things. (Luke 24: 46-48, NIV)

How can sinful humans be forgiven by God? This question resounds throughout the Bible. The Torah revolves around one answer. The prophets wrestle with the question and offer some new answers. Jesus gives us the final answer.

The biggest problem for the church, of course, is that almost no one is asking the question any more. If Jesus were to show up in Times Square and declare that forgiveness of sins can be found in him, he would be ignored like a man selling player piano music rolls.

The gospel quite often is no longer good news because we do not know we are in need of any news at all. In the language that is so popular today, Christianity is not about sin management.

Maybe not. I don’t think Jesus in Luke 24 was talking about sin management either, but he was talking about sin and forgiveness and repentance. Clearly, he was. That was what he said would be preached to all nations.

So, here is the bad news. You are a sinner. You have broken faith with God. You have rejected his commands. If you do not believe me, go pick up your Bible and read. To make this quick, read The Sermon on the Mount. It won’t take you long to find yourself there. You are a sinner. So am I.

Here is the good news. Jesus is the way to forgiveness and reconciliation with God. Repentance is open to all people everywhere. Turn to Jesus. Place your trust in him. Name him Lord. Believe in the power of his resurrection. You, sinner, can find mercy.

The gospel of Luke closes with this promise. And so do the first 24 weeks of #LukeActs2014.

The authority of Jesus

Then Jesus came to them and said,“All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. (Matthew 28:18, NIV)

All authority belongs to Jesus. That word “all” is huge. It means all, as in there in no other authority other than that which derives from Jesus. None anywhere. Not in heaven, nor on earth.

The votes of democratic majorities do not give authority. Office and position and skill do not give authority. Wealth does not give authority. Fame does not give authority. Traditions do not give authority. The only authority resides with, is found in, Jesus.

If the president of the United States is aligned with Jesus, then his authority is genuine. If he (or she) is not, then the president may have power, but no authority. Lots of people in our world have power and exert power. But they do not have authority. Their power is used in godless ways.

Jesus has all authority. If we would have authority, it must come from him.

This is an amazingly, breath-takingly, radical statement by Jesus.